October 18, 2016; Beaufort County Schools
Kathy Parker, Digital Citizenship and School Library Media Consultant, NCDPI, DTL

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Navigate to: http://bit.ly/copyrightbcs







Session Overview:
How do you model ethical use of information and technology resources? Does the professional development you deliver comply with copyright law? Are you unsure about what materials you can post to your websites? Let's consider copyright and educational fair use's implications to our work.


Learner Outcomes: Participants will...

  • identify fair use conditions for education
  • evaluate copyright compliance in given scenarios
  • reflect on their current practice
  • examine resources to teach copyright



Use Today's Meet as a communication channel.


Professional Standards Connection (10 mins.)

Pair Share: How are intellectual property rights related to your role as an educator? What challenges does this pose for you and/or your colleagues?








Fair Use Analysis: You be the Judge! (20 mins.)

Below are some scenarios. Decide if each warrants a closer look at fair use. If so, apply Columbia's fair use checklist and determine if the scenario favors fair use. Be ready to defend your judgment call.

(Presume that no special permission has been given or sought in the scenarios.)

Scenario A: A high school English teacher shows Disney's movie Pocahontas to her English III students who are studying John Smith's A General History of Virginia. During the movie, students identify similarities and differences between the movie and the literature. Students also note elements in both the movie and the literature that are most likely fictional. In addition, throughout the movie the teacher stops the viewing, and students discuss cultural aspects depicted in the movie about Native Americans and Europeans.

Scenario B: A high school English teacher streams a Netflix Pocahontas video to her English III students who are studying John Smith's A General History of Virginia. During the movie, students identify similarities and differences between the movie and the literature. Students also note elements in both the movie and the literature that are most likely fictional. In addition, throughout the movie the teacher stops the viewing, and students discuss cultural aspects depicted in the movie about Native Americans and Europeans.

Scenario C: An elementary school teacher wants to promote reading for Literacy Week, so she videotapes herself reading aloud several popular children's books. She reads the books in their entirety and holds the books so that viewers can see the pages. She posts the videos on her Facebook page.

Scenario D: A teacher creates a presentation for her students studying natural disasters. Her presentation includes images to exemplify her points. She gathered the images online from various websites. She credits the sources of these images in her presentation. She posts this presentation on her website so that it is openly accessible.




Resources For Another Day

NCWiseowl Copyright Support










Disclaimer: This is for informational purposes only so that you can learn more about copyright and fair use. It is not for the purpose of providing legal advice. Please consult a lawyer if you want legal advice.